An Iridescent Light Green Bird That Looks More Than A Little Flamboyant As He Jauntily Flaunts His Pointed, Orange Crest, And Pure White Speed Stripe!


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A STRIKING BIRD WITH HIS FLAMBOYANT POINTED ORANGE CREST, IRIDESCENT LIGHT GREEN BELLY, AND WHITE BANDED RUMP!

MEET THE RUFOUS-CRESTED COQUETTE

Photo Courtesy of Instagram/tropicalbirding

The rufous-crested coquette (Lophornis delattrei), is a species of hummingbird native to the tropical slopes of pacific South America. The adult male has a crest of orange feathers tipped with black, extending from a head covered in rufous plumage. A band of white feathers crosses his rump, with brown, orange, and green tail feathers extending posteriorly from it. His belly and back are covered in a light iridescent green. His throat is a darker green with feathers that end posteriorly in small pointed white feathers. A vertical band of rufous feathers frames his green throat and tail feathers which end in a double-rounded shape.

Photo Courtesy of Francesco Veronesi / CC BY-SA 2.0

Not quite as conspicuous as the male, the female has a rusty forehead and throat, lacking the green throat and orange crest he has.

She also has a broad white cheek stripe separated by a dusky green center to the throat and dusky brown below.

Photo Courtesy of Instagram/lindsay_naturephotos

 Rufous-crested coquettes inhabit the Pacific and Caribbean mountainsides of Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Costa Rica, with at least one sighting in western Brazil.

Photo Courtesy of Instagram/wildfrank_natureshot

In their range, these birds like to inhabit subtropical or tropical lowland and montane forests at altitudes of 500m โ€“ 1,900m above sea level.

Photo Courtesy of Instagram/francescveronesi

Rufous-crested Coquettes primarily feed on nectar taken from a wide variety of brightly colored, scented small flowers on trees, herbs, shrubs, and epiphytes. Favoring flowers with high sugar content these birds aggressively protect those areas containing high-energy nectar. They use their long, extendible, straw-like tongues to retrieve the nectar while hovering with their tails cocked upward. They have also been known to sometimes dine on insects and spiders.

Photo Courtesy of Instagram/best_bird_shots

During the breeding season, which is pretty much all your round, a cup-shaped nest is built by the female out of plant fibers woven together and green moss. It is usually built in a bush, shrub, or small tree. She lines it with soft plant fibers, animal air, and feather-down. She lays one white egg within, then feeds her chicks regurgitated insects once they have hatched. After about 20 days the chicks are fully-fledged. Pretty much the only part of the breeding process the male is involved in is the act of mating itself.

Photo Courtesy of Instagram/julioc.telloalvarado

Though rare the Rufous-crested coquetteโ€™s population appears to be stable. Thus the IUCN red list ranks this species as at least concern.

Photo Courtesy of Instagram/theperutravelexperience

WATCH THIS BIRD RIGHT HERE IN THE VIDEO BELOW:

H/T Wikipedia โ€“ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

His Eye-poppingly Red Forehead Compliments His Fiery Red Throat Creating A Montage Of Color Combining With Beautifully Vivid Yellows And Greens!

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Hasan